Meredith Arthur: The Flavor Bible

Just won for Reference and Scholarship. A plug for it: the book was a great idea and a whole new way to think about food in the sort of conceptual way chefs do. I have a feeling a lot more books will follow its lead soon.

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Snack: In the press room with Aldo Sohm

Enjoying a glass of champagne after winning outstanding wine service. He said he couldn't hear what was announced and missed hearing his name. Happily Eric Ripert who was sitting next to him did, and elbowed him to go up on stage. Congratulations a tous au Bernardin. I believe this win completes their set of beard awards. photo2

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Louise McCready: Recipe for the recession

"We're going to cook, dine, and eat our way out of these tough times." Host Susan Ungaro, president of JBF, said those words, and I wish Obama were at the JBF Awards tonight to hear that advice. Though cooking, and especially baking, can be frustrating, and bordering on failure, at times (I'm specifically thinking of the frequent fire alarms of my childhood signaling the fact that my mom was preparing dinner and the acrid smell of smoke during mealtime), cooking can also help solve a number of our nation's problems, from promoting good nutrition to staunch the rising cost of health care to breaking our nation's cycle of consumption by spending more time cooking at home.

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Adam Sachs: Brief conversations with anonymous food industry folks

Q: Who is the hottest woman in food? A: Martha Stewart. Q: Of all time? A: Yes, of all time!

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Meredith Arthur: Hines wins Best Chef: Northwest

I hadn't heard of Seattle-based chef Maria Hines, but she made a great entrance. She was out cooking for the event and came running in to accept her Best Chef: Northwest award in the nick of time. When she did make it to the stage she thanked her wife for allowing her to put a lien on the house to open the restaurant. It was adorable and showed how truly hardworking chefs really are.

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Awards Watch: America's Classics

The black-tied chefs here tonight who toil in fine dining kitchens have no doubt earned the honors they receive, but there's a special place in everyone's heart for the winners of the America's Classics. These local eateries are fixtures in their communities. They are the places you want to eat should you find yourself in the neighborhood. Most have been around for generations. And they serve the sort of down-home, delicious food that James Beard loved. Here is a complete list of the more than 60 recipients who have received this special award.

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Snack: The reception doesn't start for hours

But they've been setting up since this afternoon.

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Jody Williams: Women and money

Jamie Leeds---the chef of Hank's Oyster Bar and Commonwealth Gastropub in Washington, D.C.---has three restaurants. She did it in five years. Women need to talk about money: how did you finance your restaurants? Leeds cashed out her 401k and mortgaged her house! Advice to the young: follow your dream even if you have to buy secondhand plates!

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Winners!

Be sure to check our twitter feed (on the right side of your screen) to see the winners as they're announced!

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Adam Sachs: Reverse martinis

A crowded press room. People in black tie watching the awards on TV. There is a palpable need for strong martinis. We're in luck. Sort of. The lovely Charlotte Voisey, William Grant & Sons mixologist, has a plan to save us all from our worst instincts. Tonight at the Hendricks Gin Bar she's serving thematically correct Reverse Martinis. "This was Julia Childs's favorite cocktail---very sophisticated and Julia knew best that too much ethanol before dinner killed your palate. Instead of 5-to-1 gin to vermouth, she drank 5-to-1 vermouth to gin." For tonight's VIP dinner, Voisey is swapping Lillet for vermouth. "It seemed right that we pay tribute to Julia with this drink." Fitting and probably saving VIP from standing for Very Inebriated Press.

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