Eye Candy: Beard House

Beignets Caramelized garden onion beignets, prepared by Jason Robinson and his team from the Inn at Dos Brisas in Washington, TX. April 28, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Lisa Ozag)

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Sea Beans

Sea Beans WHAT? Nautical haricots verts. Popeye may have had spinach, but a seafaring vegetarian's delight is the sea bean. The American sea bean is a type of samphire [SAM-fy-uhr] known as salicornia. Its other aliases are glasswort (it was used to make glass at one time), marsh samphire, and sea pickle. Sea beans proliferate on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Some have spiky green leaves that make the plant look like a skinny miniature cactus without the needles. Others look surprisingly similar to Chinese long beans. The crisp leaves and stems smell and taste like sea salt. Fresh sea beans can be found from the summer through the fall, and are best when used fresh or pickled. When cooked, sea beans have a tendency to taste salty and even fishy. WHERE? Dominic Zumpano's Beard House dinner WHEN?

Comments (0)

The Bookshelf: Beard on Books Recap

olives and orangesYesterday, at Beard on Books, Sara Jenkins discussed her cookbook Olives & Oranges: Recipes and Flavor Secrets from Italy, Spain, Cyprus & Beyond with guests at the Beard House. She joked that she is “really a home cook who got misplaced in a professional kitchen,” and in testing recipes for the book she happily rediscovered the joys of home cooking. Jenkins truly believes that simplicity rules: “The greatest thing you can do to food is not mess it up.” As the daughter of a foreign correspondent, Jenkins grew up throughout the Mediterranean. While in Italy, Lebanon, and Cyprus, she was exposed to a rural existence where electricity was a novelty and eating with friends and family was at the heart of life. Her memories are filled with good food and wonderful ingredien

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Beard House

Alain Allegretti's hors d'oeuvre Tuna niçoise with sliced cucumbers, quail eggs, and tapenade, part of Alain Allegretti's Provençal dinner at the Beard House. May 6, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Geoff Mottram)

Comments (0)

Free Money: 2009 JBF Scholarships

There is still time to apply for a 2009 JBF Scholarship and make culinary school a reality. With over 75 scholarships and tuition waivers available for schools all over the world, realizing your culinary dreams has never been easier. The FINAL DEADLINE for Applications is MAY 15. Apply now!

Comments (0)

Food Matters: Breakfast for Dessert

Honey, Bacon, and Apricot Cornbread with Maple Ice Cream

Salty, crispy, and unrelentingly popular, bacon seems to have its greasy grip on nearly every dish, cocktail, or bizarre internet meme we encounter these days. Needless to say, we weren't surprised last year when the pork product started showing up in desserts at the Beard House and around the country. But then it became clear that an even larger, sunnier trend was emerging: breakfast-inspired desserts. Some stem from a pastry chef's personal morning ritual, while others are pure like-you're-a-kid-again fun. Whatever the inspiration, we're just happy that we don't have to set our alarms to enjoy these morning-style treats.

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Beard House

Tru Dessert Plates of smoked chocolate crémeux with naval orange, salted hazelnuts, and malted caramel, prepared by Meg Galus of Tru in Chicago. April 29, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Philip Gross)

Comments (0)

MemorEATS: Odessa Piper

"Once, to break the tyranny of a long flight I emulsified a pat of butter that came with the dinner roll into the vinaigrette that came from the salad and made a passable beurre blanc using heat from the plate the entrée came on. I topped that with a pinch of Malden salt (I keep a small tin of it with me at all times). It was an improvement." –JBF Award Winner Odessa Piper

Comments (0)

The Bookshelf: Olives & Oranges

We asked Sara Jenkins, chef/owner of NYC's wildly popular Porchetta and co-author of Olives & Oranges,  which five pantry items she always has on hand. Tomorrow, May 13th, Sara Jenkins will be joining us in the Dining Room of the historic Beard House for Beard on Books, a monthly literary series featuring some of the food world's most celebrated authors. olivesoranges1. Olive Oil “I could never live without olive oil—extra virgin, of course.” 2. Za’atar “I do everything with it. I put it on fish, chicken, even sprinkle it over thick yogurt with olive oil to use as a dip.” 3. Piment d’Espelette “This coarse-ground dried chile has some kick but isn’t too hot. I use it for everything from salads to roasted vegetables and braised meats.” 4. Dried Pasta “You can always make something with pasta. I look for artisanal pasta

Comments (0)

The Bookshelf: Olives & Oranges

We asked Sara Jenkins, chef/owner of NYC's wildly popular Porchetta and co-author of Olives & Oranges,  which five pantry items she always has on hand. Tomorrow, May 13th, Sara Jenkins will be joining us in the Dining Room of the historic Beard House for Beard on Books, a monthly literary series featuring some of the food world's most celebrated authors. olivesoranges1. Olive Oil “I could never live without olive oil—extra virgin, of course.” 2. Za’atar “I do everything with it. I put it on fish, chicken, even sprinkle it over thick yogurt with olive oil to use as a dip.” 3. Piment d’Espelette “This coarse-ground dried chile has some kick but isn’t too hot. I use it for everything from salads to roasted vegetables and braised meats.” 4. Dried Pasta “You can always make something with pasta. I look for artisanal pasta

Comments (0)

Pages