Tweet Eats: American Artisanal Cheeses

Cheese You guys sure love American cheese! We asked our Twitter followers about their favorite artisanal American cheeses and the responses were fast, furious, and delicious. Here are just a few to whet your appetite. Got cheese on the brain? Which ones did we miss? @kmistry73: Rogue Creamery’s Smoked Blue @Jnil88: Grayson Cheese from Meadow Creek Farm, VA.. Stinky is good! @kasekaiserina: Estrella Family, Meadow Creek, Lazy Lady, @TwigFarm, Consider Bardwell, Cato Corner, Andante, Capriole. Could name so many more dairies/cheeses. Point is: the American Cheese Revolution is here! So jazzed to be a part of it. @Gaaa79: fresh goat cheese made with cranberry and honey, i think it’s made in Broksville, found it at a market in union square! @DTarch: Gr

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MemorEATS: Christopher Lee

"I was cooking dinner for my family and I forgot the garlic bread in the oven under the broiler. By the time I got to the oven, the bread was blazing and the only thing to do was to open the sliding door and throw a flaming sheet tray across my yard. I wrecked the oven, but the neighbors got a good show." –JBF Award Winner Christopher Lee, Aureole, NYC

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Recipe: James Beard’s Moules Marinière

Mussels This deliciously simple recipe from Beard’s American Cookery puts us in the Bastille Day spirit. Make sure you have plenty of fresh, crusty baguette on hand to soak up the buttery, aromatic broth. 2 to 3 quarts mussels, scrubbed and bearded 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 large onion, thinly sliced 2 to 3 sprigs parsley 1 stick unsalted butter 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper ½ cup white wine ½ cup chopped parsley ¼ teaspoon Tabasco Place the garlic, onion, parsley sprigs, 4 tablespoons of the butter, salt, and pepper in a large pot. Add the mussels and pour the wine over them. Cover tightly and cook over low heat until the shells open. Transfer the mussels to a soup tureen or serving dish. Add the remaining butter, chopped parsley, and Tabasco to the pot. Adjust the seasoning and serve the mussels in soup plates along with some of the broth and plenty of crusty bread.

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The Bookshelf: Clark Wolf on Cheese

American CheesesBack when America's idea of cheese amounted to electric orange slices of, well, American cheese, Clark Wolf was stocking the shelves of his San Francisco shop with artisanal cheeses from around the country. These days small-scale American cheese production is something to be proud of, and Wolf continues to follow the transformed industry’s every move. Wolf, who now owns his own consulting company, Clark Wolf Company, will stop by this week’s B

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Reel Food: Chefs for Scher Benefit

Last night’s Friends of James Beard Benefit at the Bowery Hotel was a walk-around tasting event that featured dishes from Bobby Flay, Scott Conant, Laurent Torondel, and scads of other chefs who got together to raise money for the Steven Scher Memorial Scholarship, in honor of the late, great restaurateur Steven Scher. The Feedbag caught it on tape—watch the video here.

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Enzo Fargione While plating the first course of his inventive and ambitious dinner, Enzo Fargione finished his branzino carpaccio with a citrus dressing. Every Beard House diner received the course in their own cigar box, which chef Fargione pumped full of smoke for added flavor and theatrical effect. June 17, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Tom Kirkman)

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Recipe: Grilled Sirloin with Ginger and Garlic

Steak Chef Bo Kline of Typhoon! in Portland, Oregon, cooked up this simple, summery steak when he visited the Beard House. The combination of garlic, ginger, and soy sauce make a deliciously savory dish for your next backyard barbecue.

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Eat this Word: White Truffles

White TrufflesWHAT? Treasured tuber. “Nobody dares admit that he has been present at a meal where there was not at least one dish with truffles,” wrote France’s favorite foodie, Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, in his Physiology of Taste (1825). Truffles are mysterious, underground fungi that grow in some areas, on some trees (mostly oak), in some years. They have been known throughout history, though their popularity peaked during the nineteenth and late twentieth centuries, right up to our time. Truffles are hunted by dogs and pigs (although some people swear by flies) trained to recognize the unique, pungent truffle scent. Of the 100 varieties of truffles grown naturally around the world, white truffles (tuber magnatum pico), also known as Alba truffles or Italian truffles, are the most expensive variety on the market (a three-pound sucker went for $330,000 in late 2007, setting the record for a single truffle’s price tag). Although they are also

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