Humanitarian of the Year Michel Nischan in the NYT

2015 Humanitarian of the Year winner Michel Nischan

 

Last week we announced that chef and sustainability advocate Michel Nischan will receive our 2015 Humanitarian of the Year award. Right on the heels of this news, the New York Times profiled Nischan in this past weekend's "Download" column. Michel shared tidbits about his choice reads (one of his favorite books is James Beard's Beard on Bread), most cherished kitchen tools, and love of pétanque, the French analog of bocce ball. Read the full piece here.

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What We're Reading: February 4, 2015

 

Leggo that Eggo and dig into the history of the Belgian waffle. [HuffPo

 

Save yourself from a sad desk lunch by improving your sandwich construction. [Food52

 

A new restaurant in NYC is offering the little-known Acadian cuisine. [Fork in the Road

 

Does this yogurt go with my shoes? Yoplait unleashes a line of designer-styled cups. [... Read more >

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JBF is Coming to a Town Near You!

 

 

Wednesday, March 4, 6:30 P.M.
Celebrity Chef Tour / Napa, CA

The Pear Southern Bistro
720 Main Street

For reservations or more information, please call 503.864.4600 or visit jamesbeard.org/celebrity-chef-tour.

 

Thursday, March 12, 6:30 P.M.
Celebrity Chef Tour / Los Angeles

L.A. Hotel Downtown
333 South Figueroa Street

For reservations or more information, please call 212.617.1133 or visit jamesbeard.org/celebrity-chef-tour.

 

Saturday, March 21, 6:00 P.M.... Read more >

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Eat this Word: Satsuma

satsuma

 

WHAT? The satsuma citrus fruit originated in sixteenth-century Japan, in a province that was once of the same name. The fruit hopscotched to England and Italy a few centuries later, followed by a leap to New Orleans, where it would eventually grow into a respectable crop in the nearby coastal parish of Plaquemines. (Japan still boasts the largest satsuma industry in the world.) A member of the mandarin family, the satsuma rarely contains pesky seeds, and can survive temperatures as low as 13 degrees Fahrenheit, with Louisiana farmers favoring the Owari cultivar for its especially hardy character. Ready for picking in October and still on branches beyond December, satsumas are a popular holiday fruit throughout the South. Cajun cooks add segments to salads, reduce juices for glazing seafood and sweets, and even slip the fruit into the occasional gumbo pot. The satsuma’s peel detaches easily from its fle... Read more >

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What We're Reading: February 3, 2015

 

Shake off the February chill with these hearty lasagna recipes. [Serious Eats

 

Unsurprisingly, the current Congress does not rate very highly on Food Policy Action’s National Food Policy Scorecard. [Civil Eats

 

One of the newest shareholders in Shake Shack is none other than PETA. [Fork in the Road

 

Muse upon the merits of the maitake mushroom. [... Read more >

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Our Favorite Beard House Dishes in January

Chef Josh Boeckleman in the Beard House kitchen

 

 

At the Beard House, 2015 arrived full of promise, bringing us delicious, thought-provoking flavors from Philadelphia, New Orleans, and Kansas City, Missouri. Here are our editors' favorite dishes from January. 

 

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Périgord Black Truffles with Farm Egg, Farro Verde, and Sunchokes

 

Périgord Black Truffles with Farm Egg, Farro Verde, and Sunchokes / The New Classic

 

Layers of umami-packed, freshly shaved black truffles? Check. Luxurious egg yolk? Trendy grain with an ancient pedigree? Perfect balance of texture and flavor? Check, check, and check. Just one look at the menu description of this beaut... Read more >

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Roasting: Our Favorite Way to Cook in Winter

 

Roasting is our go-to cooking method during the colder months. A hot oven, a generous pour of olive oil, and a sprinkling of salt is all you need to produce simple but spectacular dishes. But with a little bit of finesse, the technique can also yield sophisticated results, as in the following recipes:

 

Roasted Clams with Herb Jam and Chorizo Butter

Slices of crusty bread provide a bed for the clams in the roasting pan, and are perfect for sopping up the paprika-spiked chorizo butter.

 

Roasted Pineapple with Prosciutto

A welcome alternative to prosciutto-and-melon, this playful appetizer is made with a pineapple that's been roasted whole.

 

Smothered Pork Roast

This tender pork shoulder f... Read more >

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What We're Reading: February 2, 2015

 
 
 
To juice, or to blend? That is the question. [

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Happy Hour: The Hooker

The Hooker cocktail

 

A jilted John Lee Hooker comforted himself with “one bourbon, one scotch, one beer.” Those wanting a more efficient consolation should seek out this marvelous cocktail by mixologist Jamie Boudreau from Seattle's acclaimed Canon. “It came about as John Lee Hooker's song came on the sound system. It made me realize that I hadn't heard of or seen a cocktail with bourbon, scotch and beer as ingredients, so I set about to make one. Surprisingly it became very popular.” Can't make it to the Pacific Northwest? Don't fret: we've got the recipe right here.

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On the Menu: Week of February 2

 

Here's what's coming up at the James Beard House and around the country:

 

Monday, February 2, 7:00 P.M.
The Mighty Virginia Shack
Dubbed “the Incredible Restaurant that Nobody Knows About” by Josh Ozersky, the Shack—a tiny, 16-seat phenomenon—is run by pedigreed chef and JBF Award semifinalist Ian Boden. The chef’s ambitious tasting menu is usually served on weekends only, but he’s bending the rules for this not-to-be-missed Beard House event.

 

Tuesday, February 3, 7:00 P.M.
Bottega: Italy to Spain with a Southern Accent
Don’t miss this incredible opportunity to experience JBF Award winner Frank Stitt’s legendary cooking. A local-food pioneer and Southern culinary stalwart, Stitt brought exceptional, Italian-inflected cuisine to Alabama with the opening of Bottega in 1988. Joi... Read more >

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