Eat this Word: Piloncillo

piloncillo

WHAT?
Sugar cone. Mexicans have long used piloncillo to sweeten their café de olla, an earthy espresso invigorated by cinnamon and citrus. Also known in South America as panela or panocha, piloncillo is cane sugar juice that has been melted into a dense syrup and then poured into cone-shaped molds. Once solid, these small caramel-colored cylinders are pliable enough to be grated, usually with the side of a serrated knife, or crushed in a molcajete (a traditional mortar and pestle). Piloncillo imparts a unique flavor with hints of smoky molasses and deep mineral notes that distinguish it from traditional refined white sugar. Renowned modern Mexican chef Richard Sandoval uses the versatile ingredient in savory dishes like seared sesame-crusted tuna or on crunchy buñelos layered with fresh whipped cream. WHERE? Abraham Sa

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On the Menu: October 22 through October 29

Whether it's a black pudding tart, smoked Nantucket Bay scallop, or Ligurian-style braised beef, there's something for every palate this week at the Beard House. Saturday, October 22, 7:00 P.M. Iconic British Brasserie A longtime favorite among royals and celebrities, iconic London restaurant Le Caprice has recently opened an NYC outpost where Ed Carew, Michael White’s former chef de cuisine at Fiamma, turns out cutting-edge brasserie fare. For this dinner, Carew will join forces with his British counterpart, Tim Hughes, to prepare a meal fit for a king. Sunday, October 23, 5:00 P.M. Atlanta: Friends of James Beard Benefit Our perennially popular Sunday Supper series is returning to Atlanta for a second year of fantastic food and festivities. Hosted by JBF Award winners Anne

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Recipe Roundup: October 21, 2011

lentilsThe blogosphere’s sprawling universe of recipes is inspiring, diverse, and—let’s face it—a bit daunting. Our recipe roundup does all the heavy sifting to single out recent, mouthwatering recipes from our favorite blogs. All you have to do is click and cook! Fines Herbes Omelet [NYT] Think you know how to make an omelet? Unless you’re Jacques Pépin, there's always room for improvement. Carrot and Lentil Soup [Leite's Culinaria] Red lentils add body and depth to this vibrant-hued Aryuvedic soup.

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Recipe: Sticky Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears

Sticky Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears

When deciding on what to serve for dessert when entertaining a large group, it's often easiest to fall back on a shareable, one-pan pie or cake and call it a day. But if your kitchen's arsenal includes a muffin tin, you can easily prepare several individual desserts with the same amount of effort. Take these perfect-for-fall ginger cakes from chefs Tom Berry and Liz O’Connell. They're made with a standard cake batter that's sweetened with a simple date purée. After baking in a muffin tin, the charming cakes are slicked with a buttery rum glaze and topped with caramelized pears. Get the recipe here.

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Recipe: Kale Caesar Salad with Crispy Bacon, Garlic Panko Crumbs, and White Anchovies

Kale Caesar Salad with Crispy Bacon, Garlic Panko Crumbs, and White Anchovies

Crimped and crunchy kale leaves stand in for romaine in this spin on the classic Caesar salad from Boston chef Marc Orfaly. Oregano and chile flakes enliven the requisite bread crumbs, while hot sauce makes the dressing extra powerful. Get the recipe here.

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On the Menu: Iconic British Brasserie

Ed Carew and Tim Hughes A longtime favorite among royals and celebrities, iconic London restaurant Le Caprice has recently opened an NYC outpost where Ed Carew, Michael White’s former chef de cuisine at Fiamma, turns out cutting-edge brasserie fare. For Saturday night's Beard House dinner, Carew will join forces with his British counterpart, Tim Hughes, to prepare a meal fit for a king. Have a look at the menu below, then click here to make a reservation. Hors d’Oeuvre Scallop–Black Pudding Tarts with Calvados and Apples Kipper Pâté with Pickled Samphire and Soda Bread Crispy Bone Marrow with Parsley on Grilled Ciabatta Hamachi Tartare with Apple, Celeriac, and Pickled Mustard Seeds Pork Belly and Fried Clam Skew

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Eat this Word: Monte Cristo

Monte Cristo

WHAT? The count’s revenge? The origins of this rich sandwich of ham, chicken or turkey, and Swiss cheese that is either dipped in egg and fried in butter or made with already dipped and fried French toast are not clear. A staple of diners across the country, where it is sometimes served with jelly or maple syrup for dipping, the sandwich is thought to be related to the club sandwich, or maybe the Reuben (Jewish delicatessens sometimes substitute corned beef and sauerkraut for the traditional fillings). Lieut.-Col. Newnham-Davis, author of The Gourmet Guide to Europe (1903), suggests a Spanish ancestor, a sandwich from Seville for which "a slice of ham is put between two slices of bread and dipped in sherry, [then] in egg and fried." In truth the sandwich was probably the fruit of a creative line-cook’s imagination, or maybe just an accident. One thing that mystifies is the name. There is nothing in Dumas’s masterpiece to suggest why a san

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