On the Menu: June 21 to June 27

Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: 1beardhouse03amitzimorris1 Monday, June 22, 7:00 P.M. Artisanal European Wine Dinner Not long ago Shin Thompson and friends began hosting an underground dining club out of their tiny Chicago apartments; within a couple of years they had opened a restaurant. Today Bonsoirée thrills diners with carefully composed tasting menus, all of which feature chef Thompson’s imaginative French cuisine presented with Japanese precision. Tuesday, June 23, 7:00 P.M. Chefs of Steel At the D.C. area’s acclaimed 2941 restaurant, chefs Jonathan Krinn and Jon Mathieson won awards and accolades for their creative modern American cuisine. Now, as co-chefs of Inox (French for

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Tastebud: Introducing the Sudachi

Looking to put some pep on your plate? Consider the zesty sudachi, a prized Japanese citrus that remains largely unknown to American diners. Despite its humble size—its average weight hovers between one and one and a half ounces—a sudachi packs more zippy flavor than lemons or limes. The perfume of its skin fades as the fruit matures, so growers harvest the sudachi when still green and unripe. Japanese chefs use it to garnish sashimi and season grilled fish, soups, and hot pot dishes. Sudachi trees thrive in the warm, gentle climate of Tokushima, a prefecture on the southern coast of Japan, where they are a cheap commodity. But throughout the rest of the country sudachi are considered a delicacy and fetch sky-high prices. Beyond Japan’s borders, the fruit is rarely seen.

Fortunately, chefs who cooked at the Beard House this spring gave diners a taste without asking to see a passport: Asiate’s Brandon Kida served sudachi granita, while David Myers and Noriyuki Sugie paired sudachi with fluke sashimi. And next Monday, Shin Thompson of Chicago’s Boinsoirée will serve the citrus with sea beans, pickled radishes, duck skin, cucumber... Read more >

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Recipe: James Beard's Steak Pizzaiola

SteakThis saucy, savory steak is sure to impress your friends at your next weekend barbecue. In James Beard's Treasury of Outdoor Cooking, Beard suggests serving this grilled steak (which is then quickly simmered in a garlicky tomato sauce) with a side of buttered noodles (to soak up the sauce), a mixed salad with garlic croutons, and a bottle of Valpolicella.

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Recipe: James Beard's Steak Pizzaiola

SteakThis saucy, savory steak is sure to impress your friends at your next weekend barbecue. In James Beard's Treasury of Outdoor Cooking, Beard suggests serving this grilled steak (which is then quickly simmered in a garlicky tomato sauce) with a side of buttered noodles (to soak up the sauce), a mixed salad with garlic croutons, and a bottle of Valpolicella.

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Wild Alaskan Coho Salmon Burger

A wild Alaskan coho salmon burger, part of the seafood-driven dinner prepared by Ben Pollinger and Jansen Chen of Oceana in New York.

June 10, 2009, The Beard House, NYC

(Photo by Geoff Mottram)

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Q & A: Wolfgang Puck

Wolfgang PuckHe's opened countless restaurants, hosted one the earliest Food Network programs, and prepared the maiden Beard House benefit dinner in 1987. See what Wolfgang Puck—one of the first inductees into our Who's Who of Food and Beverage in America—has to say about his upcoming projects, America's "food revolution," and his mother's Wienerschnitzel.

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Reel Food: Teaching Tofu at the Astor Center

Chef Toshio Suzuki speaks to attendees about tofu uses; he stands before trays holding dishes of hiya yakko (cold tofu) with various toppings.

Chef Toshio Suzuki speaks to attendees about tofu uses; he stands before trays holding dishes of hiya yakko (cold tofu) with various toppings.

The latest installment of the JBF Master Classes for Chefs series, a partnership with the Gohan Society and the Astor Center to offer JBF professional-level members classes on Japanese ingredients and techniques, took place yesterday at the Astor Center. The topic? The production and uses of tofu (past classes have covered soy sauce, nabe cooking, Japanese pickling, and nigiri and maki sushi making). Held in the Astor Center's study and kitchen, the session was packed with demonstrations and lectures from Toshio Suzuki of Sushi Zen, Noriyuki Kobayashi of Megu Midtown, and Kazuhiro Saito of Nori. And then there were the tastings: over 20 dishes were pre

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Recipe: Sweet Pea Toasts with Spicy Coppa

Sugar Snap PeasChef Kimball Jones served these easy, pleasing hors d'oeuvre when he cooked at the Beard House. If you want to make the toasts vegetarian, Jones suggests substituting Parmesan cheese for the coppa.

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Roasted Heirloom Beets

Roasted heirloom beets with Hudson Valley goat cheese, American black walnut vinaigrette, and micro-herbs—the first course at Philip Campanella's Beard House lunch. June 5, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Erin Gleeson)

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Eat this Word: Bagna Cauda

Bagna CaudaWHAT? A hot soak for your veggies. Bagna cauda, Italian for hot bath, is a very old dish with a Piedmont pedigree. Once considered a poor man's meal, bagna cauda has become one of the region's most popular foods. The "bath" is a tangy sauce made from garlic, olive oil, and anchovy; butter is often added in as well. To keep the sauce hot, it's typically served over a flame. Raw, or sometimes lightly cooked vegetables, cut into bite-size pieces, are dipped into it using a long-pronged fork. In Piedmont, fennel, cauliflower, cabbage, and red peppers are the veggies of choice, but any vegetable that's good to eat raw works well with bagna cauda, too. WHERE? Enzo Fargione's Beard House dinner WHEN? June 17, 2009

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