Tastebud: The ABCs of CSAs

The concept of community-supported agriculture—purchasing a share from a local farm in exchange for weekly hauls of fruits and veggies—arrived in this country over 20 years ago, but lately we've noticed that specialty CSAs have sprouted up to feed the appetites of every kind of food enthusiast.

Cheese lovers in Warwick, Massachusetts, flock to the CSA at Chase Hill Farm for sweet raw milk cheeses; fromage fans in eastern Kansas head to Gasper Family Farm, where they can also fill their totes with non-homogenized milk, butter, and yogurt. In upstate New York, the 8 O’clock Ranch ships cuts of 100 percent grass-fed lamb, beef, and pork to its members, while JBF nominee Craig Deihl’s Artisan Meat Share is going strong in Charleston.

Local wines and beer have spilled into CSA boxes, too. Enlightenment Wines in Brooklyn sponsors a “Community Supported Alcohol” program that supplies seasonal offerings like sparkling apple meads and oaked blackcurrant wines, while those looking for something sudsy can opt for the

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Food Matters: Artisan Meat for All

As we foresaw in our 2010 food trend predictions, CSAs aren't just for produce anymore. Take the Artisan Meat Share in Charleston: run by Craig Deihl of Cypress, the operation distributes quarterly shares of house-cured and -smoked meats to about 100 members. Customers get to enjoy fresh product at home, and the restaurant raises revenue and reduces waste. You can read more about Artisan Meat Share here. (And check out

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On the Menu: 2010 Food Trends

crystal ball Just about every foodie forum has prophesied what we’ll see on our plates next year, so we thought we’d get in on the act, too. Behold, the James Beard Foundation’s predictions for 2010 food trends! Meatballs: When we heard that a meatball shop will soon open in New York City, we got a gut feeling that they will be rolling onto many a menu next year. (Seeing this slideshow on the Bon Appétit website confirmed our suspicions.) Given that mouths everywhere have yet to grow weary of the upscale burger trend that shows no signs of stopping, a drift toward these other hand-formed mounds of ground meat seems inevitable. Also:

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