Recipe Roundup: Pasta

 

Reinvent pasta night with a bowl of one of these impressive but easy-to-make carb-laden entrées.

 

Crab Carbonara with Meyer Lemon, Black Pepper, and Parsley

Dungeness crabmeat and a squeeze of Meyer lemon juice give the classic carbonara company-worthy panache.

 

Pappardelle with Duck and Juniper Ragù

Red wine, brandy, and citrus zest intensify this rich, hearty winter dish.

 

Rao's Cappelletti con Prosciutto e Radicchio

Cappelletti is similar to a freshly made mini tortellini. You can substitute store-bought cheese tortellini or ravioli.

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Recipe: Buttermilk Channel's Duck Meat Loaf

Recipe for Buttermilk Channel's duck meat loaf Ryan Angulo puts a sophisticated spin on meat loaf by using succulent duck
 breast, sweet raisins, and grassy herbs. Two duck breasts will yield the necessary meat and fat for this recipe. Your butcher can remove the thick slabs of fat from the meat and grind the two parts separately.

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Eat This Word: Carnitas

The James Beard Foundation on carnitas
WHAT? Mexican confit. Though the word carnitas can refer to any small bits of cooked meat—that are usually served in soft corn tacos at roadside stands throughout Mexico—the most common is pork. To make pork carnitas, large pieces of shoulder and other fatty parts of the pig are simmered in vats of lard until they are crisp on the outside and juicy and tender on the inside. The meat is removed from the fat, drained, and broken up into small shreds that are then stuffed into tacos. (Where there are carnitas, there are usually chicherones, or crisp, fried pork skins.) The western part of central Mexico, namely Michoacán, is known for carnitas, but truth be told they are tasty just about everywhere—even Queens, New York.

WHERE? Ivy Stark, Scott Linquist, and Hugo Reyes's Beard House dinner

WHEN? May 21, 2010

HOW? Roast Duck Breast and Duck Carnitas Enchiladas with Dried Fruit,

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Eat this Word: Croque Monsieur

croque monsieurWHAT? A ham-'n-cheese sandwich with a French twist. The classic croque monsieur, darling of cash-poor tourists and French folk-on-the-go, is buttered bread, Gruyère cheese, and lean ham, fried in clarified butter. In the good old days before even the French began to rush their meals, it was served as an hors d'oeuvre, a tea sandwich, or the main event in a (pre-cholesterol) light lunch. The modern version of this "crunchy sir" is more often a ham-and-Swiss combo, toasted in a grill press and served hot and delicious at cafes and street stalls, so even those Francophiles most pressed for time don't have to settle for McDonald's. Apparently when it crosses the ocean, this impeccably pedigreed Gallic standard gets some new clothes: this month at the Beard House, for instance, it's served with duck pastrami. WHERE? JBF Award winner Donald Link, Ryan

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Recipe: Pappardelle with Duck and Juniper Ragù

ragùFlat, long, and wide, pappardelle are the perfect noodles for a hefty ragù. We especially love this duck and juniper–studded version from our friends at the Apicius International School of Hospitality. You can find juniper berries in the spice section of many specialty and gourmet food stores.

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Recipe: Crispy Long Island Duck Breast with Parsnip Purée, Duck Confit, and Spiced Cherry Glaze

duck breast Hector Tice of the Black Duck in New York City served this very apropos duck breast dish at his Beard House luncheon. The luscious parsnip purée is a worthy partner for duck, while the spiced cherry glaze imparts some welcome tang.

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