Eat this Word: Purslane

PurslaneWHAT? In the weeds. The Forme of Cury, the earliest known English cookbook (published around 1390 by Richard II's cooks), asks for "purslarye" in a salad recipe; colonists brought the plant to America, where they used it as an herb and pickled it for a condiment; and a few sources say it was Ghandi's favorite vegetable. It's a main ingredient in fattoush, a Middle-Eastern bread salad, and Arabs once believed that if sprinkled around the bed, the small, oval-shaped leaves could chase away erotic dreams. (Why they'd want to, we don't know.) At some point in this country, purslane fell into disfavor. Waverly Root quotes a certain William Cobett on purslane in 1819: "a mischievous weed that Frenchmen and pigs eat when they can get nothing else." Happily, American chefs are rediscovering the herb's subtly tart pleasures. WHERE? Tom Crenshaw's Beard House Dinner

Comments (0)

On the Menu: July 18 through July 24

Guests enjoy dinner in the Beard House dining room. Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House and around the country next week: Tuesday, July 20, 6:30 P.M. Sunset Summer Cruise Looking for dinner and a view? Guests on this sumptuous sunset cruise will enjoy panoramic vistas of the New York City skyline and an impeccable, regionally inspired menu of canapés prepared by Larry Forgione protégé Philip Campanella while sailing around Manhattan on the magnificent Valiant Yacht. Tuesday, July 20, 6:30 P.M. The Farm Stand The JBF Greens and Food Bank For New York City Young Professionals are joining forces once again for an evening of all things local and sustainable. Guests will sample great food prepared by some of New York City's most talented farm-dedicated chefs and herb

Comments (0)