Awards Watch: Calling All Opinionated Foodies

Voting for James Beard Award nominees begins on October 15, 2010. It seems our little item about the location of the 2011 Beard Award nominees announcement set off a flurry of questions about online voting and submissions. Well, we have one answer: nominations voting and entry forms will be available on October 15 at jamesbeard.org/awards. That gives you a few weeks to think long and hard about who deserves a nomination for cooking, journalism, food media, and restaurant design.

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Ask a Chef: Jason Wilson, Where Should We Eat in Seattle?

Jason Wilson

We asked 2010 JBF Best Chef: Northwest Award winner Jason Wilson of Seattle’s Crush for his favorite places to eat in the Emerald City.

Late-Night Dining
Jade Garden
206.622.8181
424 7th Avenue South
“They have live tanks that are always full of spot prawns, which I get wok-fried with salt and pepper.”


Quintessential Northwest Cooking
Lark
206.323.5275
926 12th Avenue
“Chef Johnathan Sundstrom has a great connection with the Northwest producers, and his food really speaks to these connections.”


Special Occasion
Canlis
206.283.3313
2576 Aurora Avenue North
“It’s a legend and they just keep getting better; Jason Franey has really lifted the food there.”


Quick snack  ... Read more >

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Awards Watch: 2011 Nominees to be Announced in Portland, Oregon

medal Extra, extra! The 2011 James Beard Award nominees will be revealed on Monday, March 21 in Portland, Oregon. JBF is thrilled to hold this exciting event in the West-Coast foodie-mecca, which also happens to be the birthplace of the big man himself. Stay tuned for details...

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Ask a Chef: Timothy Hollingsworth, What are Your Favorite Flavor Combinations?

Timothy Hollingsworth
This year’s JBF Rising Star Award winner, Timothy Hollingsworth of the French Laundry, gives us some great seasonal ingredient match-ups to make the most of late summer’s incredible bounty.

1.  Eggplant, Mint, and Tamarind
“The sweetness of the tamarind complements the earthy flavor of the eggplant, and both are balanced by the freshness of the mint. At the French Laundry we like to apply this flavor combination to sautéed big fin squid from Japan. At home any light seafood dish would carry the flavors well.”

2.  Tomato, Squash, Olives, and Basil
“This combination is the epitome of late summer, when the garden is producing amazing squash, tomatoes, and basil. At the restaurant I like to confit the tomatoes, brunoise the squash, olives, and basil, and serve it all over a piece of olive oil-poached cod.”

3.  Grilled Bread with

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In Memoriam: Michael Batterberry

Michael and Ariane Batterberry Along with the rest of the food world, we were saddened to learn of the death of food writer, historian, and publishing icon Michael Batterberry on July 28. Just a few months ago, the James Beard Foundation awarded the 2010 JBF Lifetime Achievement Award, which is given to an individual or individuals whose lifetime body of work has had a positive and long-lasting impact on the way we eat, cook, and think about food in America. Click here to read the essay about the Batterberrys ran in our 2010 Awards Program.

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Summer Cocktails with Steve Olson

cocktail We asked beverage expert and 2010 JBF Awards spirits chair Steve Olson about the newest trend in spirits and how he slakes his thirst in the summer. Click here for his answers, as well as a recipe for a heat-busting mezcal-based cocktail. (You can also learn more about his education and consulting company, aka wine geek, at akawinegeek.com.)

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Test Your Eat-Q: JBF Outstanding Chefs and Their Signature Dishes

Eat-QsBacon on a swing; baked Andante Dairy goat cheese with garden lettuces

Outstanding Chef Award winners from the past 20 years presented at this spring's James Beard Awards. Can you match each chef with their signature dish? Test your knowledge with this matching game from the April/May 2010 issue of JBF Notes, our member newsletter. Once you think you've got them solved, click through for the answers and your Eat-Q score. 1) Grant Achatz 2) Dan Barber 3) Lidia Bastianich 4) Mario Batali 5) Rick Bayless 6) David Bouley 7) Daniel Boulud 8) Larry Forgione 9) Thomas Keller 10) Patrick O’Connell 11) Jean Louis Palladin 12) Alfred Portale 13) Wolfgang Puck 14) Michel Richard 15) Eric

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America's Classics: The Bright Star, Bessemer, Alabama

America’s Classics Award–winning restaurants have timeless appeal and are beloved in their regions for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Here is the final eatery that earned this prestigious distinction in 2010. A clump of feta, tucked in a salad of iceberg and cucumbers. A stipple of oregano on a broiled snapper fillet. At the Bright Star in Bessemer, Alabama, an old steel town southwest of Birmingham, the vestiges of Greece are few. Greek immigrants built the Bright Star, a vintage dining hall of intricately patterned tile floors, nicotine-patinaed woodwork, WPA-era murals of the old country, and brass chandeliers. The Bright Star opened in 1907. Descendants of Bright Star founding fathers—Tom Bonduris and his cousin Bill Koikos, natives of the farming village of Peleta in the mountainous Peloponnesus region —still work the floor. Jimmy Koikos, a septuagenarian, and brother Nicky, seven years his junior, are in charge now. The menu is an honest—and very old—fusion, Greek meets Southern, as interpreted by African American cooks: fried red snapper throats, house-cut from whole Gulf fish, are on the menu

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Ask a Chef: Mike Lata, What Are Your Favorite Summer Ingredients?

Mike Lata 2009 JBF Award winner Mike Lata is the chef of the celebrated FIG (Food Is Good) restaurant in Charleston, South Carolina. He recently talked to us about his favorite summertime foods.

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America's Classics: Calumet Fisheries, Chicago

America’s Classics Award–winning restaurants have timeless appeal and are beloved in their regions for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be spotlighting the eateries that earned this prestigious distinction in 2010. Chicago’s 95th Street Bridge, which spans the Calumet River on the city’s South Side, is known for two things. One, in the movie The Blues Brothers, Elwood demonstrated the capabilities of his new car by jumping the bridge. Two, it’s the home of Calumet Fisheries, a stand-alone hutch that has been frying and smoking seafood since 1948, when brothers-in-law Sid Kotlick and Len Toll opened the place. To this day, the Kotlick and Toll families run the joint. It’s strictly carryout. No seating, no bathroom, no credit cards. And, if you believe the ominous street sign, no parking. The place draws a working-class, melting-pot crowd, and a fair number of amateur fishermen. (The murky Calumet is a good place to find bluegill.) Fried perch, smelts, and frogs’ legs are big here, but they also bring in scallops, crab, catfish, and oysters. The fried stuff is very good, but what you really

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