Eat this Word: Asian Pear

asian pears

WHAT? Faux fusion fruit. Sometimes called apple-pears, Asian pears are not, in fact, a cross between the two, but are rather the pear varieties that grow in China and Japan. (For the last century, we’ve grown them in the United States as well, mostly in the Northwest.) But Asian pears, though juicy like a pear, are apple-shaped and have the crispness of a good apple. In Japan, where they are known as nashi, they are a popular autumn dessert, served in neatly peeled slices. Asian pears come in various shades of russet and yellow, depending on the variety. They may be the ancestor of our more familiar Western pears. WHEN? Gregory Elliott's Beard House dinner WHERE? October 14, 2011 WHAT? Hamachi Crudo with

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On the Menu: October 9 through October 14

Along with our usual sumptuous fare, we've got some excellent wines on the menu next week. Sunday, October 9, 7:00 P.M. Miami Beach: Friends of James Beard Benefit With its bold cuisine, slick design, and discerning clientele, Red the Steakhouse is the place in Miami Beach to see, be seen, and be well fed. Join us at this Friends of James Beard Benefit for an outstanding menu prepared by chef Peter Vauthy and acclaimed local chefs. Tuesday, October 11, 6:30 P.M. Beard on Wine; The Belinda Chang Sessions Spend a fun, informative, and indulgent hour with sommelier Belinda Chang, who will guide us through a variety of exciting wine topics and tastings of unique bottles. Classes are one hour long and each features a tasting and discussion of six special wines. Wednesday, October

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On the Menu: Hamptons Classic

Joseph RealmutoJoseph Realmuto

From Mexican street food-turned-haute cuisine to exquisite Mediterranean fare, tomorrow night's Beard House menu, created by the talented chefs of Honest Man Restaurant Group, reflects the laid-back elegance of the South Fork. Locally sourced ingredients support the sophisticated flavors that have turned these restaurants into the favored dining spots of the Hamptons elite. To make a reservation for this event, which will also feature Long Island wines, click here. Hors d’Oeuvre Montauk Lobster with Butter and Garden Thyme on Housemade Potato Buns Housemade Foie Gras Torchon with Balsam Farms Strawberry–Garden Rhubarb Jam on Toasted Brioche Diver Scallop Crudo with Grapefruit and Amagansett Sea Salt Suppli di Telefono

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On the Menu: October 3 through October 6

On the MenuWhat better way to welcome October than with a fall feast at the Beard House? Monday, October 3, 7:00 P.M. Louisiana Style Diners at Drew’s Bayshore Bistro can enjoy a true down-home, low country meal without even leaving the tri-state area. Run by chef/owner Andrew Araneo, a 2010 JBF Award semifinalist for Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic, Drew’s upscale bistro fare features the best of Gulf Coast cuisine: bold flavors, Cajun specialties, and spectacular seafood. Tuesday, October 4, 7:00 P.M. Hamptons Classic From Mexican street food–turned–haute cuisine to exquisite Mediterranean fare, the menu created by these talented chefs reflects the laid-back elegance of the South Fork. Locally sourced ingredients support the sophisticated flavors that have turned these restaurants

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Eat this Word: Licorice Root

Licorice Root WHAT? Revered root. Licorice root was so prized in ancient Egypt that generous supplies of it were found in King Tut’s tomb, and hieroglyphics suggest it was the starring ingredient in a popular beverage. Used to treat ailments from arthritis to ulcers, the root is said to promote vitality, soothe and detoxify the body, and act as an anti-inflammatory. The botanical name for this savory stem is Glycyrrhiza, which means “sweet root” in Greek. It is used to flavor cough drops and tonics, as well as certain beers, ice creams, and even meat products. Contrary to popular belief, however, it’s not licorice root that flavors the confection that bears its name—it’s aniseed. WHERE? Steven Gugelmeier, Mark Steele, Scott Warrick, Russell Weir, Giuseppe Calabro's Beard House dinner WHEN?

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On the Menu: Chefs Behind the Chef

Missy Robbins Great chefs know they are only as good as the people they hire. As the executive chef of both A Voce outposts, Missy Robbins not only oversees the restaurants’ uniquely authentic-yet-modern Italian cuisine but has also assembled a top-notch team of chefs whose impressive skills highlight the striking talent of their mentor. The A Voce crew will be cooking their signature Italian fare at the Beard House on Monday, September 19. Have a look at the menu below, then click here to make a reservation. Hors d’Oeuvre Roasted Porchetta with Coriander Vinaigrette Mozzarella di Bufala with Dried Olives and Calabrian Chilies Zucchini–Bianchetti Fritti > Zucchini Fritters Fonduta-Filled Cassoncini Cured Sardines with

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On the Menu: Italian Luncheon

Craig Wallen At charming West Village newcomer Spasso (Italian for “amusement”), executive chef Craig Wallen has created a crowd-pleasing menu of traditional and contemporary regional dishes. A Michael White protégé who also cooked with Mario Batali at Lupa, Wallen knows his way around an Italian kitchen and delivers the seasonal, osteria-inspired fare to prove it. If you're looking for a leisurely way to spend this Friday's lunch hour, we invite you to join us at the Beard House for an Italian meal prepared by Wallen. Click here to make a reservation. Hors d’Oeuvre Chicken Liver Crostini Lardo Fried Oysters with Lemon–Caper Crema Stracciatella Cheese on Grilled Bread Pairings: Opera 02 Lambrusco Rosé 2009; Opera 02 Lambrusco Amabile 2009 Luncheon Rabbit

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Eat this Word: Kabayaki

Kabayaki WHAT? Slithery sustenance. The Japanese love kabayaki—grilled eel in a sweet, soy-based sauce—so much, they have even dedicated an entire day to eating it. On Ushinohi, which is celebrated in August, eel restaurants all over Japan do a booming business; politicians are sometimes photographed smiling as they dine on their kabayaki; and, according to Charmaine Solomon’s Encyclopedia of Asian Food, 900 tons of eel are consumed. The eel is served over rice and is thought to be restorative in the enervating August heat. A Dictionary of Japanese Food calls kabayaki "one of Japan’s great treats," and a Japanese friend confirms that Japanese people would consider it right up there with sushi and tempura as a representative food of their country. These days though, she confesses, not everybody eats kabayaki straight from the grill as a connoisseur would insist. "Nowadays you can buy it in the supermarket and microwave it." WHERE?

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On the Menu: Brooklyn Cooks

Brooklyn Cooks For the next installment of our Greens programming series, we're bringing the best of Brooklyn to the Beard House! Join us on September 18 for a special multi-course dinner prepared by the chefs, wine experts, and butchers that make Brooklyn the city's most creative food borough. Participating chefs include Saul Bolton of Saul and Vanderbilt, Jessica and Josh Applestone Fleisher's Grass-Fed and Organic Meats, and George Weld of Egg. The full lineup and menu, including some recently added wine pairings, can be found

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Eat This Word: Pipikaula

The James Beard Foundation on pipikaula

WHAT? Hawaiian beef jerky. A traditional nibble at a Lu‘ au feast, pipikaula did, in fact, evolve from beef jerky. According to Time-Life’s Pacific and Southeast Asian Cooking, islanders were introduced to the snack by Yankee whalers who plied the seas around Hawaii. Traditionally, strips of beef are marinated in salt, soy sauce, and garlic, then dried outdoors in a screened box that keeps flies away. Contemporary recipes often give instructions for cooking in a very low oven. "Pipi," by the way, is the Hawaiian word for beef or cow; "kaula" the word for rope. It’s neither here nor there, but we were interested to learn that Tibetans make their own version of jerky from yak meat.

WHERE? Darren Demaya, Colin Hazama, and Jon Matsubara's Beard House dinner

WHEN? September 14, 2011

HOW? Keahole Lobster... Read more >

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