Giveaway: Know Your Coffee

We’re back with more coffee knowledge from Master Barista Giorgio Milos. In addition to trivia, we’ve got a bonus video of the master himself demonstrating the perfect free-pour latte. (Does his art match the level of creativity we saw in our Latte Art Contest?)

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The Bookshelf: William Grimes's Favorite New York Restaurants of Yore

Many of New York's iconic dining establishments vanished from the pages of Zagat long ago, but there are some that William Grimes, former New York Times restaurant critic and author of Appetite City, told us he would love to eat in if he had a time machine. Here's a stroll down memory lane: Clark and Brown’s Chophouse Water Street, circa 1830 “One of the earliest and most famous examples of a restaurant style that, along with the oyster cellar (see below), defined New York dining. Mutton chops were the big thing, thick, juicy, and bordered with a nice stripe of fat. Bread toasted over the open fire with a fork was the usual accompaniment, along with English ale.” Dorlon’s Fulton Market, circa 1870 “Just finding Dorlon’s, the city’s premier oyster house, r

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Recipe: Strawberry–Rhubarb Crunch

Rhubarb season's days are numbered, so squeeze some of these blushing stalks into your week with this fast and unfussy strawberry–rhubarb crunch. The dessert can easily be made with just rhubarb, but be sure to adjust the sugar accordingly; ample sweetness is crucial when taming the fruit's intensely tart flavor.

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Eye Candy: Apricot Bread Pudding

A serving of apricot bread pudding gets a finishing touch of crème anglaise at the end of the Humberto Campos's Beard House dinner. Campos, who owns Lorena's in Maplewood, New Jersey, prepared a seasonally driven menu of French fare. Check out more photos here.

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Recipe: English Pea Risotto

English peas—commonly known as garden peas—give tiny bursts of green to this simple but satisfying risotto from chef Jeff Rogers. Unlike sugar snaps, English pods are inedible. (But you should save them for vegetable stock.)

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Eat this Word: Sake

WHAT? For goodness, sake. Considered Japan’s national drink, sake is made by inoculating white rice with a special mould (Aspergillus oryzae), mixing it with pure water, and allowing it to ferment. It’s a process more similar to beer making than to wine making, but sake is nevertheless usually translated as "rice wine." Also like beer, sake is best drunk young—Shizuo Tsuji, author of Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art (Kodansha), says experts recommend three months of age. Sake comes graded into classes: tokkyu (special class), ikkyu (first class) and nikyu (second class), but unlike French cru classifications, these do not designate quality. What you drink your sake in depends on whether you drink it hot or cold. Cold sake is usually served in cedar boxes called masuzake, sometimes with salt. Hot sake is served in small ceramic carafes called tokkuri, and is drunk from little cups.

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