Recipe Roundup: October 28, 2011


The blogosphere’s sprawling universe of recipes is inspiring, diverse, and—let’s face it—a bit daunting. Our recipe roundup does all the heavy sifting to single out recent, mouthwatering recipes from our favorite blogs. All you have to do is click and cook!

Pumpkin-Shaped Cheddar Crackers [SE]
Use a biscuit cutter and a paring knife to turn these flaky, cheddar crackers into little pumpkins. 

Homemade Peanut Butter Cups [G

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Recipe Roundup: Wild Mushrooms


Though it can be next to impossible to get a wild mushroom forager to share his secret patch, it's never hard to find a recipe that puts the flavorful funghi to good use. Here are a few of our favorites. Soufflé Crêpes with Wild Mushrooms and Crescenza Cheese Golden crêpes are filled with earthy sautéed mushrooms and a savory pastry cream made with soft-ripened Crescenza cheese. Wild Mushroom Grits with Low Country Oyster Stew Use freshly shucked oysters in this classic Southern stew, which is served over creamy wild mushroom grits. Wild Mushroom and Ro

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Wine Wisdom: Natural Wine Picks

To producers and wine geeks, natural wine defies precise definition: it can indicate an absence of additives and pesticides; a gentle handling of grapes and soil; or even the ancient methods of the biodynamic approach. But consumers only need to know this: many natural wines exhibit rich and unique character, as well as a strong sense of terroir. If you’re on the hunt for a memorable bottle, there’s a good chance that a naturally produced wine will fit the bill.

To get some recommendations for affordable natural pours, we turned to Jenny Lefcourt of Jenny & François Selections, which specializes in naturally made European wines.


Domaine Binner Saveurs 2009 (biodynamic/$18)
"This floral and fruity white is light and versatile. Enjoy it with seafood, grilled chicken, and even mildly spicy Asian dishes."

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Recipe: Drunken Risotto with Wild Mushrooms

Drunken Risotto with Wild Mushrooms

Nothing complements a crisp, woodsy fall day better than a bowl of rich and toothsome risotto. This earthy version from chef Joel Huff features a grab bag of wild mushrooms, which will only be available for another week or so. (We've recently spotted chanterelles, king oysters, and maitakes at our local farmers' market.) For the wine, feel free to use any uncorked red you have on hand, though we prefer to pour in a Burgundy or Oregon Pinot Noir; the typical "forest floor" character found in these wines is a natural match for the other flavors in the dish. Get the recipe here.

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Voting with Your Forks: How We Can All Have a Positive Impact on our Food System

Insufficient access to fresh food. Childhood obesity. Eroded soil. Many of us know that our food system is rife with problems, but aren’t sure how we, as food shoppers, cooks, and eaters, can bring about change.

The key, according to Karen Karp, president of NYC food business consultancy Karp Resources and a partner in planning the recent JBF Food Conference, is to focus on making progress—and remember that we won’t solve these big problems all at once. “Sustainability is a journey, not a destination,” says Karp. “That kind of thinking can really instigate some change.”

Our 2011 Leadership Award recipients and members of our advisory board agree that there is a lot we can all do. Here are their suggestions.


“Cook. If you don’t cook your food it invariably gets cooked for you. It gets processed and it gets manipulated. And when that happens you eat less nutritiously. And the environment suffers. And f

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Market Haul: After Apple-Picking Edition


For I have had too much 
Of apple-picking: I am overtired
 Of the great harvest I myself desired. –Robert Frost, “After Apple Picking”

Apple picking is an eagerly anticipated autumn ritual. Crisp fall air, cider donuts, hayrides, a bright wagon overflowing with apples that we are sure we will put to delicious use—sometimes it’s easy to get a little carried away. Once home with our invariably enormous haul, we begin to cook with the best of intentions. But after baking a pie or two and making a couple batches of applesauce without seeing a noticeable dent in the apple stores, panic can begin to set in. What’s an overly ambitious apple picker to do? Here are a few ideas.

The Haul: Apples. Many, many apples.

The Tools: A

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