Eat this Word: Eggnog

eggnogWHAT? Holiday spirit. Decking the halls, singing carols, and supping on yuletide fare can render a reveler somewhat parched. Enter eggnog, a seemingly harmless holiday beverage that has been known to lure many naïve merrymakers into making fools of themselves at office Christmas parties. The sweet, creamy concoction is said to owe its heritage to posset, an English drink that early Americans adapted to create eggnog. In The Complete Book of Spirits, Anthony Dias Blue wrote, “[George] Washington’s two favorite drinks were eggnog and rum punch, both of which were served at almost all events in the colonies during…the War of Independence.” Though various recipes exist, the base for eggnog almost always consists of eggs, cream, sugar, and vanilla. And though it most often is mixed with rum, bourbon and whiskey are common alternatives. WHERE?

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On the Menu: December 13 to December 19

Kitchen Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: Monday, December 14, 6:00 P.M. Beard Burger ‘Bun’anza New York’s top chefs put their unique spins on the all-American burger. Fabulous wine, beer, and cocktails will be served. Tuesday, December 15, 7:00 P.M. Christmas in Connecticut In the 1945 film Christmas in Connecticut, a stranded sailor dreams of a gourmet five-course feast. Luckily for us, the decadent yuletide meal is no illusion as talented Connecticut chef Dan Kardos joins us at the Beard House with a seasonal and locally sourced menu filled with holiday cheer. Wednesday, December 16, 12:00 P.M. Beard on Books

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On the Menu: Bobby Hellen Cooks a Dream Feast for Meatavores

Bobby Hellen We're doing things a little differently at the Beard House tonight: revered meat "prodigy" and Resto chef Bobby Hellen is roasting an entire pig and lamb for a nose-to-tail, family-style meal of meat mania (we won't tell your doctor if you don't tell ours). Check out the evening's goods: Boudin Noir Tart with Cheddar–Apple Purée Crumble; and Lamb Heart Confit with Celeriac and Chestnuts Pig’s Leg Salad with Chicory, Pig’s Ears, and Warm Guanciale Vin Lamb Neck Salad with Banyuls and Caramelized Yogurt Porchetta with Fennel Pollen, Rosemary, Thyme, and Pig Liver Lamb Roulade with Lemon Zest and Parsley Pork Ribs with Salt and Pepper Lamb Ribs with Belgian Carbonnade Sauce and Pickled Carrots Charcuterie Plate > Boudin Blanc, Lamb–Pepper Sausage, Pork–Garlic Sausage, Andouille Sausage, Pork Liver Pâté, and Head Cheese, Served with Whole-Grain Mustard, Apples, and Frisée From the Caja

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The Bookshelf: Marcus Samuelsson's New American Table

New American TableIn spite of yesterday's bleak weather, Beard on Books had a full house for JBF Award Winner Marcus Samuelsson's poignant discussion of his new cookbook, New American Table. An Ethiopian who grew up in Sweden, trained in France, and fearlessly crossed the pond to the States in his early twenties, the chef has a refreshingly unique perspective on American cuisine and a moving affection for its regional cooking traditions. His new book is not only a tribute to our food, but a token of gratitude as well. "I put all of my chips on food when I was young, but my other big decision was to go to the diverse universe of America," Samuelsson remarked. "I wanted to be in a place where people wouldn't focus on my background, and I knew I could find that in New York City." The chef recounted his determination to get to Manhattan (the French chef he worked for told him he couldn't "leave the macaron for th

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The Bookshelf: Marcus Samuelsson's New American Table

New American TableIn spite of yesterday's bleak weather, Beard on Books had a full house for JBF Award Winner Marcus Samuelsson's poignant discussion of his new cookbook, New American Table. An Ethiopian who grew up in Sweden, trained in France, and fearlessly crossed the pond to the States in his early twenties, the chef has a refreshingly unique perspective on American cuisine and a moving affection for its regional cooking traditions. His new book is not only a tribute to our food, but a token of gratitude as well. "I put all of my chips on food when I was young, but my other big decision was to go to the diverse universe of America," Samuelsson remarked. "I wanted to be in a place where people wouldn't focus on my background, and I knew I could find that in New York City." The chef recounted his determination to get to Manhattan (the French chef he worked for told him he couldn't "leave the macaron for th

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Nomi crew The crew from Chicago's Nomi spreads out into the Beard House Greenhouse to plate dozens of foie gras brûlees with toasted brioche, hazelnuts, and herbs. See more images of chef Christophe David's contemporary French dinner here. (Photo by Philip Gross)

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Tastebud: Venerable, Imitable, Spreadable Camembert

camembert
 

Presented to Napoleon III on the inaugural day of the 1855 World’s Fair, Camembert first appeared during the late 19th century in the Norman village of the same name. Bloomy, fruity, and prone to spoilage, Brie-like Camembert stayed a local favorite for decades, until the invention of its signature wooden box and the advent of the railroad could carry the downy wheels to Paris and beyond. So en vogue was the cheese that it became the most copied in the world, prompting the French government to award Normandy-produced Camembert its Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée in 1983.


Aside from inspiring imitations, the cheese has also been an unlikely muse for the arts: a limp, sun-melted wheel of Camembert moved Salvador Dali to paint the famously languid timepieces in his Surrealist masterpiece, The Persistence of Memory. According to the MoMA Highlights catalog, the artist went on to... Read more >

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Jobs We Love: Lior Lev Sercarz



A self-made spice master, Lior Lev Sercarz has rubbed elbows with the world's greatest chefs. Read on to learn more about his special blend of work.

James Beard Foundation: What’s your job description?

Lior Lev Sercarz: I own La Boîte à Epice, a line of unique and, at times, personalized spice blends for chefs all over the country as well as home cooks. I also produce a seasonal biscuit collection called La Boîte à Biscuits.

JBF: How did you get your job?

LLS: It took me 12 years to put the concept together while working around the world for some amazing chefs. One day, three years ago, I just started my own business, creating everything from nothing.

JBF: What past experiences have prepared you for your current position?

LLS: I started cooking 15 years ago for a catering company in Israel. I stayed there for three years, then

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