The Bookshelf: The Flavor Bible

The Flavor Bible Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of the JBF Award–winning cookbook, The Flavor Bible, give us some exciting flavor combinations and tell us why they work. Bacon and chocolate Why it works: The balance of tastes. Bacon provides the saltiness and the crunch, while chocolate adds a bittersweet quality and creaminess. Blueberries and mushrooms Why it works: Tradition. You can almost imagine the Italians as they foraged for blueberries and mushrooms, deciding that “if they grow together, they go together” before tossing them both into risotto. Vanilla with shellfish Why it works: It brings out sweet undertones. Vanilla enhances the savory-sweetness of lobster, scallops, and other shellfish. Miso and steak Why it works: Umami. Umami, the fifth taste, is know

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Recipe: Alexandre Dumas Potato Salad

Potato Salad This recipe, originally published in The New James Beard, and again in Beard on Food, is an easy addition to your 4th of July picnic. Beard wrote, “Alexandre Dumas was not only a great playwright and novelist, best known for The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers, but was also a great authority on food. This 19th-century recipe for potato salad is surprisingly simple and contemporary.”

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Charcuterie Clark Frasier and Mark Gaier of Arrows and MC Perkins Cove served this housemade charcuterie at their strictly farm-to-table dinner; it included pepperoni, vintage 2007 prosciutto, quail sausage, and garlic sausage. June 15, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Joan Garvin)

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Eat this Word: Limoncello

LimoncelloWHAT? Lemon-aid. "Sweet, fragrant, powerful and very easy to drink," says World Food Italy guidebook about the traditional lemon-scented digestif from the Amalfi coast. Culinaria: Italy adds that limoncello is "just as essential an end to a Campanian meal as grappa or anise liqueur is in other regions." Until recently, limoncello was hand produced by artisans, or made at home from prized recipes; lately, commercialization of the liqueur has begun, often substituting inferior products. Authentic limoncello is made from Italy’s indigenous, aromatic Nostrano lemons, but it is possible to make an approximation of the intensely citrusy drink by infusing alcohol with lemon peel for 20 days or more, then mixing it with sugar syrup. Can't get your hands on Nostrano lemons? The next best thing is to have a lemon tree, or a friend with a lemon tree. Serve limoncello very cold in very small glasses. WHERE?

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Dacquoise Haznelnut dacquoise with chocolate chantilly cream, Hawaiian sea salt, and gold leaf, the dessert served at Dominic Zumpano's stylish, multicultural dinner. May 27, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Tom Kirkman)

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On the Menu: June 28 to July 4

Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: kitchen1aeileenmiller Monday, June 29, 7:00 P.M. Summer Rosé Celebration Top Chef fans, take note: talented former contestant Ariane Duarte will be packing her knives and coming to the Beard House for this spectacular wine lovers’ dinner. The chef and owner of the acclaimed CulinAriane, Duarte has designed an artfully composed menu to pair with summer rosés from wine store Amanti Vino. Wednesday, July 1, 7:00 P.M. Canada Day: Newfoundland On July 1, 1867, British Parliament united the four provinces of Canada under one federation, and a country was born. To mark the majestic nation’s birthday, we’ve invited this talented group of Newfoundland chefs to the Beard House to

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On the Menu: Food Network New York City Wine and Food Festival

If you’re as big of a food fan as we are, you’ve probably already marked your calendar for this year’s Food Network New York City Wine and Food Festival. This year the James Beard Foundation is partnering with the festival to bring you an exciting line-up of exclusive dining events at the Beard House! While our dinners prepared by Alain Ducasse and the trio of Marcus Samuelsson, Giada De Laurentiis, and Zac Posen (yes, that Zac Posen) have already sold out, there are still seats available for an incredible Oktoberfest celebration with JBF Award winner Gabriel Kreuther and a sinful chocolate lovers’ brunch prepared by Mr. Chocolate himself, Jacque Torres, along with chefs from the French Culinary Institute. Tickets are going quickly, so call 866.969.2933 or visit www.nycwineandfoodfestival.com to reserve seats at these one-of-a-kind events!

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Recipe: James Beard's Galette Pérougienne

BerriesTry this “wonderfully good” yeast dough-based dessert as the finale to an outdoor summer luncheon. James Beard felt it had “all the virtues of French country cooking – it is simple, inexpensive, and makes thoroughly delicious eating.” Enjoy it with crème fraîche and a combination of summer berries.

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Recipe: James Beard's Galette Pérougienne

BerriesTry this “wonderfully good” yeast dough-based dessert as the finale to an outdoor summer luncheon. James Beard felt it had “all the virtues of French country cooking – it is simple, inexpensive, and makes thoroughly delicious eating.” Enjoy it with crème fraîche and a combination of summer berries.

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Eat this Word: Croquettes

CroquettesWHAT? Dinner, recycled. Croquettes, originally a French term, were introduced into English cookery in the 18th century, Alan Davidson writes in his Oxford Dictionary of Food. The name comes from the French croquant, which means crunchy or crisp. Although the contents vary widely, croquettes are consistently small rounded shapes, ranging in size from a walnut to an egg, which are coated in egg and breadcrumbs and then fried, to a golden brown. Larousse writes that the filling of croquettes is a mixture of vegetables or cooked meats, usually leftover from another use, chopped fine and mixed with béchamel or brown sauce. Some of the most popular are chicken, ham, and salmon. Although in the United States, croquettes are associated, disparagingly, with '50s ladies' luncheons, their image is better elsewhere. Croquetas are eaten as sandwich fillings in Latin America and arancini, a form of Italian crocchetta, are beloved by Italian children.

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