NYC Dining with Alan Richman

Alan Richman Want to know what fine dining in New York City is all about? Multiple JBF Award–winning food writer Alan Richman tells us where he sends visitors looking for a real taste of NYC haute cuisine. Click here to for more.

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Dine Out for the Gulf Coast

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill has devastated the Gulf Coast's fishing industry and sea life, and will continue to affect the region and the livelihoods of its residents for many years. The James Beard Foundation has always cherished the area's rich culinary traditions, which are also threatened by this disaster. To show our support, we're spreading the word about Dine Out for the Gulf Coast, which is taking place June 10–12 at restaurants across the country. For three straight days, participating eateries will donate a portion of their sales to the Gulf Coast Oil Spill Fund, an organization that gives grants to nonprofits helping victims of the spill. (You can learn more from

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The Bookshelf: William Grimes's Favorite New York Restaurants of Yore

Many of New York's iconic dining establishments vanished from the pages of Zagat long ago, but there are some that William Grimes, former New York Times restaurant critic and author of Appetite City, told us he would love to eat in if he had a time machine. Here's a stroll down memory lane: Clark and Brown’s Chophouse Water Street, circa 1830 “One of the earliest and most famous examples of a restaurant style that, along with the oyster cellar (see below), defined New York dining. Mutton chops were the big thing, thick, juicy, and bordered with a nice stripe of fat. Bread toasted over the open fire with a fork was the usual accompaniment, along with English ale.” Dorlon’s Fulton Market, circa 1870 “Just finding Dorlon’s, the city’s premier oyster house,

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