Food Matters: Angelic Edibles

Angelic EdiblesWhen we saw this Chicago Tribune article about mail-order foods from monasteries and convents, we knew we should report on two books recently published by JBF members: A Taste of Heaven by Madeline Scherb and Heavenly Feasts by Marcia Kelley. Scherb and Kelley have traveled the globe to taste countless heaven-approved treats, and now they've generously shared their findings with the rest of us. Read on to learn more about the authors and the fascinating foods they unearthed.

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Recipe: Butterscotch Pudding with Molasses Crisps and Black Pepper Whipped Cream

Gale Gand Since we’ve already given you a sneak peek of Alfred Portale’s mouthwatering ravioli from tomorrow night’s menu, why not treat yourself to a little dessert as well? Gale Gand will be serving this creamy butterscotch pudding as the close to our American Icons dinner. If you don’t have a seat, you’ll want to make this one at home. The molasses crisps provide a great textural contrast to the not too sweet pudding. The finishing touch? Black pepper whipped cream cuts the richness and rounds out this delicious dessert.

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Reel Food: JBF Award Winner Alfred Portale on the Early Show

American icon and JBF Award winner Alfred Portale is cooking his way through the media circuit before he puts on his toque for our gala auction and dinner tomorrow. Check out his appearance (after a brief commercial) on this morning's Early Show on CBS:

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Reel Food: Dinner with Mathilda and Friends

On the eve of our annual gala auction and dinner, we're excited to share this short video of some lucky folks enjoying one of the live auction packages auctioned off at last year's event. With some help from Edward Lee of Magnolia 610 in Louisville, Kentucky, JBF Chairman Woodrow Campbell threw a festive head-to-tail pig roast for family and friends in his Connecticut home over the summer. Watch the video below to see chef Lee in action and the life story of a black heritage pig named Mathilda:

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Recipe: Crispy Long Island Duck Breast with Parsnip Purée, Duck Confit, and Spiced Cherry Glaze

duck breast Hector Tice of the Black Duck in New York City served this very apropos duck breast dish at his Beard House luncheon. The luscious parsnip purée is a worthy partner for duck, while the spiced cherry glaze imparts some welcome tang.

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On the Menu: American Icons Gala Auction and Dinner

American Icons More than 35 years after James Beard wrote American Cookery, American chefs have transcended their underdog status. Among those chefs who have achieved celebrity in their own right, some have even become icons. At this year's gala dinner and auction we're celebrating American cuisine and the icons who helped create it. And what better way to do so than a fantastic multi-course menu? Here's a preview of what will grace the tables at Wednesday's sold-out event at the Four Seasons Restaurant: Reception JBF Award Winner Fabio Trabocchi, The Four Seasons Restaurant, NYC Otoro with Fennel Pollen Kumamoto Oysters with Cauliflower and Lobster Aspic Parsnip Cappuccino with Périgord Black Truffles Foie Gras Sandwiches on Pain d'Epice Nantucket Bay Scallops with Parsley and Piment d'Espelette Dinner JBF Award Winner Dan Barber

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Bloomfield April Bloomfield and her team plate a pork trio of head cheese, terrine, and rillettes during her Beard House dinner last Monday. View more images of the pig-packed event here. (Photo by Eileen Miller)

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The Bookshelf: Paula Wolfert

Mediterranean Clay Pot CookingWarm and full of integrity. That’s how Barbara Haber described JBF Award winner Paula Wolfert and her recipes at Beard on Books last week. After the introduction, Wolfert gave us some background about her lifelong love affair with cooking and the foods of the Mediterranean. She quit college to attend Le Cordon Bleu and went on to work with James Beard when she was only 19. After a very hard and tiring summer doing catering jobs with John Clancy, she decided to go to Morocco. According to Wolfert, in the 1950s, “if you were a writer and a beatnik, you went to Tangiers.” She didn’t go for the food, but it worked its way into her cooking, and she expanded out into the rest of the Mediterranean and, as she says, “it swept me away.” She went on in 1973 to write Couscous and other Good Food from Morocco, which became the definitive sourcebook for Moroccan cuisine.

Years later, Wolfert has penned over a dozen... Read more >

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