Eat this Word: Lotus Root

lotus rootWHAT? Lies beneath lilies. Lotus (or water lily) flowers have been prized for their beauty for thousands of years, but below the water is another prize, the edible rhizomes, which are often mistakenly called roots. (Ginger is another type of rhizome.) Lotuses grow wild throughout mainland Asia and were introduced to Japan by China. Light in color, long, and cylindrical, when sliced the lotus root reveals a fibrous, tart flesh with a lovely lacy pattern of holes. Lotus is eaten throughout Asia. It can be blanched or steamed, served cold in salad or hot in soup, pickled, fried for tempura, stir-fried, or braised. WHERE? Shin Thompson's Beard House dinner WHEN? October 12, 2010 HOW? Crispy Suzuki with Grilled Haricot

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America's Classics: Calumet Fisheries, Chicago

America’s Classics Award–winning restaurants have timeless appeal and are beloved in their regions for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be spotlighting the eateries that earned this prestigious distinction in 2010. Chicago’s 95th Street Bridge, which spans the Calumet River on the city’s South Side, is known for two things. One, in the movie The Blues Brothers, Elwood demonstrated the capabilities of his new car by jumping the bridge. Two, it’s the home of Calumet Fisheries, a stand-alone hutch that has been frying and smoking seafood since 1948, when brothers-in-law Sid Kotlick and Len Toll opened the place. To this day, the Kotlick and Toll families run the joint. It’s strictly carryout. No seating, no bathroom, no credit cards. And, if you believe the ominous street sign, no parking. The place draws a working-class, melting-pot crowd, and a fair number of amateur fishermen. (The murky Calumet is a good place to find bluegill.) Fried perch, smelts, and frogs’ legs are big here, but they also bring in scallops, crab, catfish, and oysters. The fried stuff is very good, but what you really

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